Jun 012012
 

Authors: Jan van Aalst, Li Sha, & Christopher Teplovs

This poster explores the use of the Knowledge Space Visualizer and Inquiry Thread Analysis in the context of formative assessment of knowledge building. We applied these tools to a Knowledge Forum database created by 41 Form 4 (Grade 10) students taking physics (heat/temperature and mechanics). Findings indicated that the KSV could be used to identify the major components of the discourse and led to similar results to hand coding in identifying inquiry threads, subject to the setting of the degree of similarity. We outline possibilities for pedagogical uses of these analyses.

Jun 012012
 

Authors: Bodong Chen, Maria Chuy, Monica Resendes, & Marlene Scardamalia

Foundational to Knowledge Building pedagogy is the view that ideas ought to be at the centre of educational endeavours and continually improved through a social process, with members sharing responsibility for advancing not just individual but group knowledge. This objective has informed the design of Knowledge Forum, software that supports the pedagogy and the process of knowledge creation. Continue reading »

Jun 012012
 

Authors: Peter Pennefather

Statement of Problem. As the new outreach director for the University of Toronto Knowledge Media Design Institute (KMDI, www.kmdi.utoronto.ca), I am involved in planning how to strengthen the core purpose of that Institute so that what is reaching out is not an amorphous blob. Continue reading »

Jun 012012
 

Authors: Jim Hewitt & Earl Woodruff

Student discussions in online environments have often been criticized as lacking in coherence (Herring, 1999; Hewitt, 2001, 2003; Suthers, Vatrapu, Medina, Joseph, & Dwyer, 2008; Thomas, 2002). While the branching structure of threaded discourse is useful for sharing the many diverse ideas held by community members, there are few supports for consolidation or synthesis. Continue reading »

Jun 012012
 

Authors: Clare Brett & Jim Hewitt

Private communications (i.e. individual, unpublished communications as well as one-to-one and small group communications) within areas of public discourse may provide opportunities for particular kinds of social or cognitive moves and activities that are supported differently, or perhaps not supported, by entirely public online spaces. Continue reading »