Jun 192012
 

“…Knowledge building, as elaborated in this chapter, represents an attempt to refashion education in a fundamental way, so that it becomes a coherent effort to initiate students into a knowledge creating culture. Accordingly, it involves students not only developing knowledge-building competencies but also coming to see themselves and their work as part of the civilization-wide effort to advance knowledge frontiers. In this context, the Internet becomes more than a desktop library and a rapid mail-delivery system. It becomes the first realistic means for students to connect with civilization-wide knowledge building and to make their classroom work a part of it…”

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Jun 192012
 

 

 

How do you begin a KB inquiry?How do you assess collective understanding? How do you pinpoint the improvement of the understanding in the community?How do you assess the ideas in Knowledge Forum?How can you stimulate a powerful knowledge building discourse with young students?What were the barriers that you had to overcome to become a knowledge building teacher?  What are the challenges that you still face now? Continue reading »

Jun 012012
 

Authors: Jonathan Tepper

A true Knowledge Building environment needs to be open and flexible so users can freely discuss with each other, access information, make connections, and share content for a common purpose (Hoadley & Pea, 2001). Using technology that is open encourages adoption because it helps avoid the creepy tree-house effect (Stein, 2008) or a balkanised group think type frame-set (Stahl, 2008). Continue reading »

Jun 012012
 

Author: Glenn Wagner

Grade 12 Students at Centre Wellington District High School (Fergus, ON) completed a knowledge building cycle using Knowledge Forum in the domain of modern physics. A successful knowledge building classroom should ideally adhere to the twelve principles of knowledge building as developed by Scardamalia (20XX). Continue reading »

Jun 012012
 

Authors: Donald Neil Philip & Danielle Truswell

Following Nagel et al. (2009), we introduce the concept of the Reply Ratio–the number of replies (build-ons) divided by the number of original posts (new notes.) Extending this work, we introduce the Build-On-to-Note Reading Ratio (number of build-ons divided by the number of notes read,) and the Disproportion Ratio, an evenness parameter that is the ratio of the highest number of contributions divided by the lowest number of contributions for a given knowledge building activity. Continue reading »